Piano Sheets > Bud Powell Sheet Music > Hallucinations (ver. 2) Piano Sheet

Hallucinations (ver. 2) by Bud Powell - Piano Sheets and Free Sheet Music

  
About the Song
   Other avaliable versions of this music sheet: Version 1  Version 2  
Piano notes and music reading No language is easy to learn except for our mother tongue. Mother tongue is a language which we start learning as soon as we are conceived. But learning some other language can be difficult if you are really not into it. Piano Notes are written in a completely different language. Agreed that the characters in the piano notes are very artistic and beautiful but they are equally strange to beginners and newcomers. But here is one interesting fact. Learning music reading from a piano notes music sheet is not a very difficult task. Actually it is much easier than learning a foreign Asian language like Chinese. Memorization and repetition are the two main ingredients for success in mastering the language of piano notes. So realistically speaking, once you are done reading the basics, all you have to do is practice the language as much as you can. To say in a very classical tone, practice till each and every note starts running through your veins. (More...)    Download this sheet!
About the Artist
Earl Rudolph "Bud" Powell (September 27, 1924 – July 31, 1966 in New York City) was an American Jazz pianist. Powell has been described as one of "the two most significant pianists of the style of modern jazz that came to be known as bop", the other being his friend and contemporary Thelonious Monk.[1] Along with Monk, Charlie Parker and Dizzy Gillespie, Powell was a key player in the history of bebop, and his virtuosity as a pianist led many to call him "the Charlie Parker of the piano".[2] Powell's grandfather was a flamenco guitarist, and his father was a stride pianist.[3] The family lived in New York City.[4] Powell learned classical piano from an early age, but by the age of eight was interested in jazz, playing his own transcriptions of pianists Art Tatum and Fats Waller.[5] His older brother William played the trumpet, and by the age of fifteen Powell was playing in his brother's band. His younger brother Richie and schoolfriend Elmo Hope were also accomplished pianists who had significant careers. Thelonious Monk was an important early teacher and mentor, and a close friend throughout Powell's life, dedicating the composition "In Walked Bud" to him. In the early forties Powell played in a number of bands, including that of Cootie Williams, who had to become Powell's guardian because of his youth, and his first recording date was with Williams's band in 1944. This session included the first ever recording of Monk's "'Round Midnight". Monk also introduced Powell to the circle of bebop musicians starting to form at Minton's Playhouse, and other early recordings included sessions with Frank Socolow, Dexter Gordon, J. J. Johnson, Sonny Stitt, Fats Navarro and Kenny Clarke. In the early years of bebop, Powell and Monk, as the first great modern jazz pianists, towered over their contemporaries, Al Haig, Ralph Burns, Dodo Marmarosa, and Walter Bishop, Jr.
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Piano notes and music reading No language is easy to learn except for our mother tongue. Mother tongue is a language which we start learning as soon as we are conceived. But learning some other language can be difficult if you are really not into it. Piano Notes are written in a completely different language. Agreed that the characters in the piano notes are very artistic and beautiful but they are equally strange to beginners and newcomers. But here is one interesting fact. Learning music reading from a piano notes music sheet is not a very difficult task. Actually it is much easier than learning a foreign Asian language like Chinese. Memorization and repetition are the two main ingredients for success in mastering the language of piano notes. So realistically speaking, once you are done reading the basics, all you have to do is practice the language as much as you can. To say in a very classical tone, practice till each and every note starts running through your veins. (More...)