Piano Sheets > Beatles - The Sheet Music > Maggie Mae (ver. 1) Piano Sheet

Maggie Mae (ver. 1) by Beatles - The - Piano Sheets and Free Sheet Music

  
About the Song
"Maggie May" is a traditional Liverpool folk song (Roud #1757) about a prostitute who robbed a sailor. It has been the informal anthem of the city of Liverpool for about 150 years. John Manifold, in his Penguin Australian Song Book, writes: "A foc'sle song of Liverpool origin apparently, but immensely popular among seamen all over the world...". - see . Stan Hugill in his Shanties from the Seven Seas writes of an early reference to the song in the diary of Charles Picknell, a sailor on the convict ship Kains that sailed to Van Diemen's Land in 1830. "Maggie May" has some similarities with the American song "Nellie Gray" which was written in 1856. "Maggie" is coarse and cheerful. "Nellie" is a sad criticism of slavery which went on to become a favourite tune among bluegrass performers. This song should not be confused with Rod Stewart's song of the same name, "Maggie May", which topped.    Download this sheet!
About the Artist
The Beatles were a pop and rock group from Liverpool; England formed in 1960. Primarily consisting of John Lennon (rhythm gtr; vocals); Paul McCartney (bass gtr; vocals); George Harrison (lead gtr; vocals) and Ringo Starr (drums; vocals) throughout their career; The Beatles are recognised for leading the mid-1960s musical -British Invasion- into the United States.Although their initial musical style was rooted in 1950s rock and roll and homegrown skiffle; the group explored genres ranging from Tin Pan Alley to psychedelic rock. Their clothes; styles; and statements made them trend-setters; while their growing social awareness saw their influence extend into the social and cultural revolutions of the 1960s. "Maggie May" is a traditional Liverpool folk song (Roud #1757) about a prostitute who robbed a sailor. It has been the informal anthem of the city of Liverpool for about 150 years. John Manifold, in his Penguin Australian Song Book, writes: "A foc'sle song of Liverpool origin apparently, but immensely popular among seamen all over the world...". - see . Stan Hugill in his Shanties from the Seven Seas writes of an early reference to the song in.
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