Piano Sheets > Phillip Braham Sheet Music > Limehouse Blues (ver. 1) Piano Sheet

Limehouse Blues (ver. 1) by Phillip Braham - Piano Sheets and Free Sheet Music

  
About the Song
How to read free sheet music effectively If you are starting out learning how to play piano one of the first things is to learn how to read sheet music for piano. This includes usage of various concepts like treble clefs, bass clefs, key signature and ability to understand actual music notes. The two clefs When it comes to piano notes there are two kinds of clefs. Every clef will have a different note in the space and line. The notes typically begin from A and end with G and repeating the pattern again. Starting a piano sheet from C would then take you to D and then E. when it comes to reading sheet music it takes a little more practice and patience. You would need to memorize the music notes through acronyms to make it easier.  (More...)    Download this sheet!
About the Artist
Philip Braham (18 June 1881 – 2 May 1934) was an English composer of the early twentieth century, chiefly associated with theatrical work. Braham studied at Cambridge University before beginning a musical career in the theatre. He wrote for revues (several produced by André Charlot) and musical comedies, collaborating with Reginald Arkell, Eric Blore, Sydney Blow, G. H. Clutsam, Noël Coward, Max Darewski, Kenneth Duffield, Herbert Haines, Douglas Hoare, Ronald Jeans, Donovan Parsons, Howard Talbot, Fred Thompson and Frank Tours.[1] In World War I, Braham volunteered for medical work, being unfit for active service.[2] He began to compose music for the theatre in 1914. The best-remembered show on which he worked was probably London Calling! (1923) on which he collaborated with Coward. He also contributed additional music to the hit musical Theodore & Co (1916) and wrote the music for the hit revue Tails Up! (1918), which played at the Comedy Theatre in London for 467 performances.[3] In 1925, he collaborated with Coward in On with the Dance and John Hastings Turner on Bubbly, starring Cyril Ritchard.[4] His best-known song is the jazz standard "Limehouse Blues", which he co-wrote with Douglas Furber. It was introduced by Teddie Gerard in the 1921 West End revue A To Z, but was soon closely associated with Gertrude Lawrence, for whom it became something of a signature tune.[1]
Random article
How to read free sheet music effectively If you are starting out learning how to play piano one of the first things is to learn how to read sheet music for piano. This includes usage of various concepts like treble clefs, bass clefs, key signature and ability to understand actual music notes. The two clefs When it comes to piano notes there are two kinds of clefs. Every clef will have a different note in the space and line. The notes typically begin from A and end with G and repeating the pattern again. Starting a piano sheet from C would then take you to D and then E. when it comes to reading sheet music it takes a little more practice and patience. You would need to memorize the music notes through acronyms to make it easier.  (More...)